Faithfully serving God

David was nearing the end of his life. Although he had wanted to build the temple for God, he had not been allowed to because he was a warrior (1 Chronicles 28:2-3). Instead, he drew up the plans and what needed to be made, as well as organizing the Levites and priests to serve in the temple (see 1 Chronicles 28:11-21).

God had chosen David’s son Solomon to be David’s successor and rule for God in Israel. “He said to me, ‘Solomon your son is the one who will build my temple and my courts, for I have chosen him to become my son and I will become his father. I will establish his kingdom permanently, if he remains committed to obeying my commands and regulations, as you are doing this day’” (1 Chronicles 28:6-7). Continue reading “Faithfully serving God”

The need to be good parents

When a king neared the end of his life it was customary to designate who would succeed him. David was now an old man (1 Kings 1:1). He had yet to publicly state who would succeed him as king. His surviving oldest son was Adonijah, who expected to become the next king.

“Now Adonijah, son of David and Haggith, was promoting himself, boasting, ‘I will be king!’ He managed to acquire chariots and horsemen, as well as fifty men to serve as his royal guard. (Now his father had never corrected him by saying, ‘Why do you do such things?’ He was also very handsome and had been born right after Absalom. ) He collaborated with Joab son of Zeruiah and with Abiathar the priest, and they supported him” (1 Kings 1:5-7 NET). Continue reading “The need to be good parents”

When did the Exodus happen?

One of the debates among Old Testament scholars centres around when the Exodus happened. There are two main dates debated – in the 1400s BC and in the 1200s BC.

To date the Exodus we need to go to King Solomon, due to some statements we find concerning his reign. Solomon’s reign is dated as 976-931 BC (there was some overlap with David’s reign). This is based on checking dates in what is known as “the Davidic Dynasty” with datable Babylonian and Assyrian records at a few points of intersection. This has allowed archaeologists to place the dates of David and Solomon into a reliable framework. The most widely used chronology is based on the work of Edwin R. Thiele (more information on this can be found in Wikipedia under the article on Solomon, for those who might be interested). Continue reading “When did the Exodus happen?”