Our highest love

I guess it’s not a very well known song these days. It makes use of archaic verb endings, and is as “contemporary” as a Mozart sonata. It is the first phrase that sticks out like an iceberg in the Kalahari:

“Lord of our highest love, let now thy peace be given,
Fix all our thoughts on thee above, our hearts on thee in heaven” (Gilbert Tickle).

It is a “Communion song,” the following verses a study on the emblems of the Lord’s Supper. But that first phrase still calls us: We might love many things, family, country, or music, or the out of doors, not bad things in themselves, but the Lord is, or should be our highest love. Continue reading “Our highest love”

Garden first, house second

The tomato seeds are still sitting on the kitchen counter, waiting to be planted. Here it is, way past the last expected frost date, and all the genetic material for juicy deliciousness is still in the form of tiny round, dry discs in paper packets.

This has been a busy spring for — it seems — everything BUT gardening. The delays in planting were begun in February, when a bad case of bronchitis set in. Given the choice of scrumptious heirloom tomatoes and continuing the privilege of breathing, I chose the latter. Continue reading “Garden first, house second”

Attaching or detaching the heart?

“For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also” (Matthew 6:21).

The Christian assigns proper value, and prioritizes accordingly. The most valuable things in life are spiritual things. Worship, prayer, study, goodwill, example, influence, sharing the gospel.

These are easily lost in the mix of life’s activities.

These are easily shuffled to the bottom of the deck.

These are easily forgotten or misplaced. Continue reading “Attaching or detaching the heart?”

True north: finding a reliable path forward

A compass points toward the earth’s magnetic north. However, the true geographic north pole lies several hundreds of miles away.

Kenny, a friend of mine, recently told me about an international trip where his flight passed between the North Pole and magnetic north. At such a place, if someone were to use a compass to locate the geographic north pole it would point in the exact opposite direction! If we can assume the compass would even function.

To accurately use a compass to discover true north, you must also know your latitude. In other words, to navigate the earth requires both good instruments and the knowledge about how to use them well. For the church to reliably chart its path through difficult scenarios requires understanding how to use well the tools God has supplied for his people. In 1 Corinthians, Paul tackled a rough situation by providing some of these reliable tools for the journey. Continue reading “True north: finding a reliable path forward”

What a child’s mobile can teach the church

Randomly grab part of a child’s hot air balloon mobile and you are likely to hold a collapsed tangled mess. However, if you pick up that same mobile using the center string securing the upper most support, the entire mobile falls into place displaying the proper relationship between its various components.

Each part of the mobile is important. Yet priority is built into a mobile’s proper functioning. The church can learn a lot from a child’s mobile. Continue reading “What a child’s mobile can teach the church”

What do you worry about?

It seems that no matter when or where people live, they worry. Sometimes you get the idea that people like to worry – and possibly wouldn’t know what to do if they couldn’t!

Last year, The Independent newspaper in Great Britain interviewed 20,000 people to discover what it was that people in 2015 worried about. Surprisingly, or maybe not, the list is not too different from what Jesus talked about in Matthew 6. Continue reading “What do you worry about?”

Where your treasure is

“Did you know what an oddball you are?” This was a rhetorical question posed by a close friend when I told her of my plans for the day.

I had several tasks that needed to be done, but the morning was cool and cloudy — perfect weather for working in the garden. Additionally, we had been blessed with some rain the day before, which makes the hard clay soil much more workable. The temptation to spend the entire day outside seemed overwhelming to me. Continue reading “Where your treasure is”