Not feeling at home here

Someone said it well: During the Great Depression many Christians sang of heaven, but we don’t do that so much anymore because we have it so good right now, on earth.

Think for a moment of the many songs of heaven that came from that difficult era: “An Empty Mansion,” (1937); “Beyond the Sunset,” 1936; “Heaven Holds All for Me” (1932); “In Heaven They’re Singing” (1937); “No Tears in Heaven” (1935); “Paradise Valley” (1935), and so on.

One song writer expresses it this way: “Sometimes I grow homesick for heaven” (F.M. Lehman, “No Disappointment in Heaven.”) It’s an interesting, yet true thought to be homesick for a place we have never actually seen. Continue reading “Not feeling at home here”

Our imperishable inheritance

“The people of Joseph, Manasseh and Ephraim, received their inheritance” (Joshua 16:4 ESV).

After conquering much of the land of Canaan, the land was divided between the tribes of Israel. This was to be their inheritance. Reuben, Gad and half of the tribe of Manasseh had already received their inheritance, their land, on the east of the Jordan in the lands they conquered before entering Canaan. In return for receiving their inheritance early, they had to lead the army as they conquered the Promised Land. Continue reading “Our imperishable inheritance”

Home

In the April 2017 edition of Reader’s Digest, former Major League Baseball manager Rich Donnelly wrote, “Baseball is similar to life. You start out at home and get a little older (first base). Then, in adulthood, you’re the furthest from home you’ve ever been (second base). You get older and wiser (third base) and see home plate. Then, you realize that where you want to be is where you already were.”

As Jesus stood before the threshold of death on the cross, he told his disciples they could not go with him (John 13:36). Ever the brash one, Peter took exception. He told the Master that he would follow him anywhere and even give his own life for the Lord. Jesus knew what he said had caused his disciples to become apprehensive. Continue reading “Home”

Satan doesn’t care why we leave the Lord

Satan is doing everything he can to destroy our faith. He’s the consummate liar (John 8:44) and will use whomever or whatever is at his disposal to accomplish that goal (1 Peter 5:8).

Nothing will be spared.

The devil has no conscience, no scruples and he’s incapable of queasiness or doubt. He speaks in our voice and will ingratiate himself in any way possible to turn our head. Our constant attention is needed. Continue reading “Satan doesn’t care why we leave the Lord”

Stay focused on heaven

Edith Hamilton relates a story in her book, “Mythology” about a beautiful young lady named Atalanta.

After being rejected by her father the King for not being a male, she was left to die in the forest. Yet, she survived and became a fleet-footed huntress.

After hearing about her, several young men came to the forest to woo her. Atalanta, however, wasn’t interested in any man, only hunting and freedom. Continue reading “Stay focused on heaven”

Spiritual eyes see far beyond right now

Most people live in the moment. They live by the tactile, not the timeless.

We face problems and struggles all of our lives, but when we only live moment to moment we miss so much.

To walk by the light of the Lord means that our vision improves (1 John 1:7). The mundane is replaced by the majestic when we see as God sees.  Continue reading “Spiritual eyes see far beyond right now”

A wee view of heaven

What will it be like in heaven? Despite the word “heaven” being used so often in the New Testament (around 240 times), there are very few descriptions of what heaven will be like and even fewer that talk about what it will be like to be in heaven. I am confident there is a reason for this: how do you describe something that is so much more wonderful than anything on earth, using purely human terms? Continue reading “A wee view of heaven”

Prep work

One hour’s worth of work in the skin-scouring cold wind, and all I had to show for it was one six-pack of pansies planted under the cherry tree.

It’s not that I’m slow; well, not really. It’s not that I was digging great big holes for each one, and carefully spreading the roots around a soil mound concocted of a precise mix of humus and organic fertilizers and soil conditioners. Continue reading “Prep work”