Be filled with the Spirit

“Look carefully then how you walk, not as unwise but as wise, making the best use of the time, because the days are evil. Therefore do not be foolish, but understand what the will of the Lord is. And do not get drunk with wine, for that is debauchery, but be filled with the Spirit, addressing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody to the Lord with all your heart, giving thanks always and for everything to God the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, submitting to one another out of reverence for Christ” (Ephesians 5:15-21 NET).

As Christians, there is a distinct way we need to live. Continue reading “Be filled with the Spirit”

The last temptation of Jesus

As Jesus approached the time of betrayal, it would seem he did so with the same apprehension that you or I would have had. What lied ahead of him was the worst events you could image from either a physical or spiritual perspective.

Physically it was one of the most torturous deaths that humans had ever devised: crucifixion. The Romans had taken this form of execution to the heights of torture and humiliation, as well. From what I understand, they knew exactly where to put the nails to inflict the most excruciating pain possible. Continue reading “The last temptation of Jesus”

God’s will for my life

There seems to be a lot of concern these days of Christians trying to work out what God’s will for them is. It’s as if God has something special for each one of us to do for him, but the problem is that we have to figure it out. We read books and hear lessons about discovering God’s will for us.

This way of thinking has given me concern for a couple of reasons. First – what if I never figure out what God’s will for me is? Does this mean that I’m a failed Christian and doomed for eternity? Second – I cannot find this way of thinking anywhere in the New Testament. Continue reading “God’s will for my life”

Are they still hungry?

How often do we make rash statements? Statements, that if we had taken just a moment to think through, we would never have made, yet statements that lock us into a particular course of action. This is what we find in Acts 23.

The apostle Paul had been taken prisoner on a trumped up charge (see Acts 21:28). All the Roman commanding officer knew was that because of Paul the Jews had come close to rioting during the time of Pentecost (see Acts 20:16). When Paul spoke to him in Greek he figured out that he wasn’t the Egyptian outlaw with 4000 assassins following him. Paul offered to speak to the people and the officer gave him permission, hoping, it would seem, to gain some insight into why the people were trying to kill this man. Continue reading “Are they still hungry?”