Why blessings and boredom may not coexist

The Guardian newspaper ran a story about the rampant boredom people feel in our age. /1 We’ve changed as a result of technology and it isn’t for the better.

With the internet, games and smartphones at our fingertips, one would think boredom would be obsolete. Earlier generations would be mystified at being bored while on something as grand as the internet.

It’s certainly inconceivable to many of us who have books to fill our time. Bookworms are never bored.

Continue reading “Why blessings and boredom may not coexist”

Books, movies and marriage

The foundation of fiction or narrative nonfiction is conflict. Without it, there isn’t a story. Writers devise problems for the sake of perpetuating the story and engaging their readers.

If David Copperfield had lived in a perfect world, Dickens wouldn’t have had anything to say. In fact, books, films or television shows would cease to exist without problems. Life is painful and difficult and art reflects that fact.

Yet, it’s more complex than that. Continue reading “Books, movies and marriage”

Worship and television

“In faith, unity; in opinions, liberty; in all things, charity.”
(Alexander Campbell)

Who decides what format our worship will take?

Does our taste and preference enter into the discussion at all? I think it does, given that we have satisfied whatever guidelines the Lord has left for us to follow. It seems that these days young people and old, the left-wing and the right have an opinion about what worship should be like.

The old Restoration motif once again demonstrates the wisdom of the early leaders of our movement. Where God has taken the trouble to leave us instructions we should respectfully and rigorously apply. Where he has not given guidance, we are left to our own wisdom, so long as the result is loving and deeply respectful toward others. Continue reading “Worship and television”

A Home Edification Center

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With the Super Bowl just days away, it’s time to set up our home entertainment center. We’ll begin with the flat screen TV and we’ll go conservative: an off-brand and a modest size (42″) will cost around $700. Of course, we’ll need to add the surround sound speaker system, and that goes for about $500 (again, we’re being conservative). High definition has to be added to our cable package, and a digital recorder will ensure that we don’t miss a single play of the game. Continue reading A Home Edification Center