The Caring Son of God

One of the Stoics’ original ideas of God was a being of complete apathy.

To them, God cared about no one and nothing. William Barclay described Stoic philosophy in the First Century by writing, “No one can be greater than God; therefore no one can influence God; therefore, in the nature of things, God must be incapable of feeling.”[1]

Jesus was compassionate. He wept at the grave of his friend Lazarus (John 11:35). He felt compassion for the hungry multitude of people with him (Matthew 9:36). He showed great feeling for a leper — a person everyone avoided, and many hated — yet a person Jesus loved and healed (Mark 1:40-42). Continue reading “The Caring Son of God”

A God that feels

The ancient Greeks believed their gods were completely devoid of feeling and emotion. The gods, they thought, were so far above humanity they could not feel sorrow, pain, or grief.

Imagine a Greek who was alive in the first century and managed to read John chapter 11. In this text the son of God is overcome with feelings of sadness and grief at the death of his friend, Lazarus. Jesus was overcome with a wide array of emotions. Continue reading “A God that feels”

The Good Shepherd

Roman citizens had the absolute assurance of safe travel to any part of the known world. All a Roman had to say when traveling was, “civis romanus sum,” and free passage was guaranteed.

The ability for people to go anywhere has been prized for centuries. In Israel, the leader was the man honored with the responsibility of leading the people out and bringing them in (Numbers 27:17).

A shepherd was charged with the responsibility of leading sheep safely to food and water. He made certain the flock could “go in and out” without fail. Continue reading “The Good Shepherd”