Behold, I stand at the door and knock

Of the churches Jesus mentioned in Revelation chapters two and three, his most pointed remarks concerned the lukewarm members at Laodicea.

Laodicea, in Greek literature known as Laodikeia, was a city of Romans, Phrygians, and Syrians. It was known as a producer of a powder used to treat diseases of the eyes, probably why the Lord Jesus advised them to “buy eye salve to put on your eyes so you can see” (Revelation 3:18). Their materialism had blinded them to what was truly important: the service of God.

Jesus told them he continued to stand at the door and continued to knock. The verbs are present tense and imply continuous action. He wanted his people to understand their eternal status before him was in peril. Their materialism was taking them away from Jesus.

This picture of Jesus standing at the door and knocking represents the right to choose to obey him. God is all-powerful. He could force people to obey him if he wanted, but he gives people a choice. God allowed Adam and Eve in the garden an opportunity. They could have decided to live eternally, but instead, they chose sin.

Perhaps you have heard Jesus knocking. Will you open the door and obey the gospel? If you want salvation, it’s your decision. God is not going to force you to do what is right. You have the right to choose heaven or lose it.

In Acts chapter 26, the Apostle Paul stood before King Agrippa and recalled the events in which the staunchly loyal Saul saw the Lord on the road to Damascus. He then asked the king if he believed the prophets and said, “I know you do.” Agrippa told Paul he was almost persuaded to become a Christian.

Almost is not good enough. Many profess belief in God but are not willing to obey him. We don’t know if the king ever decided to follow Jesus. Perhaps he never did.

What about you? Do you believe the Bible? The choice is now before you. Jesus stands at the door and knocks. Will you answer?


John contributed the chapter, “The God Question,” in the book, The Right Kind of Christianity.

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