Are you worried?

According to the Centers for Disease Control, heart disease killed more than 630,000 people in 2016. That is a death from heart disease every 40 seconds. Cancer was the second most prevalent cause of death taking 596,000 people.

USA Today reported the top ten things that worry Americans are: government corruption, terrorist attacks, not enough money for the future, becoming a victim of terror, firearm restrictions, closely related people dying, economic or financial collapse, identity theft, closely related people getting sick, and Obamacare.

Not one of those things (or any other) should worry a faithful child of God. Most of them either haven’t happened or may never happen. Such is a defining characteristic of worry. One person said, “Worry is like a rocking chair. You can create a lot of motion with it, but it won’t take you anywhere.” Death is inevitable and will come to all. There is no need to worry about that which we cannot control.

In Matthew chapter six Jesus said several times, “Do not worry.” He didn’t say worry was a bad idea. He said do not worry. There are other things with which we should concern ourselves.

We should avoid covetousness (Luke 12:15). To exemplify his point, the Lord taught the parable of the rich fool. He said a wealthy man had a fantastic crop and unsatisfied with his current storage capacity he tore them all down and built larger ones. It wasn’t enough for this one to have what he needed. His desire pushed him to have more and more.

We should avoid worry about life (Luke 12:22). There is more to life than food and clothing. Faithful Christians know God understands our need and will provide those things (Matthew 6:32).

We should be concerned about the kingdom of God and serving it first (Matthew 6:33; Luke 12:31-34). Many do not concern themselves with serving God and are the poorer for it. Or, they are so consumed by what is happening to them in this life they take little notice that there is an eternity for which to prepare.

If one were to build wealth to last the ages, a castle in which to live, and the best of everything money can buy, one must still pass from this life and meet God in judgment. How much better for us is a life of service to God and each other than a heart filled with selfishness and petty things!

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John Henson

Born in Nashville, Tennessee, John Henson has been a husband for 43 years and a preacher for 34 years. He currently serves as the preacher for the Dibrell Church of Christ in McMinnville, Tennessee.

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