Negativity11

Lessons from a recovering complainer

A constantly complaining person is like a car with four flat tires. They’re stuck in misery while the rest of the world moves on with their lives.

Negativity shapes our worldview so we see the worst in everything and that takes us to the next step of permanent victimhood.

No one but the fellow negativist wants to be around a perennial complainer. While we constantly have rain falling on us, we’re obscuring everyone else’s sunshine and they want to run away.¬†Nothing grows and thrives in the world of Complaint.

A constant complainer is incapable of happiness and will find problems in school, life, employment and relationships. In fact, they will likely find comfort in their self-fulfilling prophecies of failure.

None of this should be construed as being blind to hard times. In fact, the worst times in my life brought me to this realization. As I faced one calamity after another, I realized that I couldn’t control my circumstances but I could take charge of my response.

Chronic pain patients are too often morose individuals because they’re constantly in agony. Yet, we control how we respond to pain. While it tries to take our lives, we can fight back with our minds, hearts and faith. It’s all we have left.

It’s the height of counterintuitive thought, but we can be positive while suffering from constant pain and clinical depression as long as we have Christ in our lives. The Lord begs us to be positive and to think on good things (Proverbs 17:22).

The immensely positive Philippian letter was written by a man who was wrongfully imprisoned (Philippians 1:3-4; 4:8). The secret lies in transformation (Romans 12:1-2). We allow Christ to change us until we develop spiritual vision and heaven becomes our new worldview.

Satan moves swiftly in misery but he’s repelled by happiness. Friends, shed the negativity and look for joy, instead (Hebrews 13:6). That’s where we will find our lives again.

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Richard lives in Florence, Alabama and is married to Deirdre. They have three daughters. He is an avid reader, devoted writer and lover of history and research. He is the author of "The Most Important Question" and is working on more books.

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