Better Than Improved

Contemporary colors, spacious layouts and promises of insight into the latest beckons another guest-to-become-customer to enter. Strategic placement of topics and sales items, scattered reading spots and an in-house coffee shop ensure that your stay in today’s bookstore will be lengthened as long as possible.
Invariably, nestled among the offerings is an isle filled with advice on how you can improve your life. Having difficulty with relationships? Is there a habit you want to overcome? Someone has outlined a recipe for success. Hope exudes from the implicit message, “You can do this. You can improve yourself.”
Taking responsible actions often promotes healthier aspects of living. However, for those whose humble acknowledgment that the power for a truly new life is not embedded within our self as they are driven to rely upon Christ crucified, a better-than-improved life awaits them.
On a common wooden cross the greatest power for humanity was unleashed as Jesus’ death ratified the new covenant. Through Jesus’ death, God promises to grant what no human being can do for himself or herself.
This is a life better than something improved, patched or refurbished. For those who rely upon Christ through being buried with him in baptism, the blood of Christ promises a pristine guilt-free, purpose-filled, directionally-oriented, belong-to-God’s-family type of life.
Hope for our lives to experience a genuine new beginning exists. But don’t expect to find it amidst the noise and streamers surrounding a New Year’s resolution or in the self-improvement advice from the latest guru. Rather, the Son of God died to make possible what we could not do for ourselves.


On a common wooden cross the greatest power for humanity was unleashed as Jesus’ death ratified the new covenant.

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