The Seduction

It all began with the desire, the deep-seated longing for something that he knew was wrong. But he could not help it, he allowed himself to be enticed and allured by the seduction. It wasn’t long before the seduction had conceived, and his sin had led to a birth.
Well, yes. Sounds like a pulpy novel (or Prime Time TV?), doesn’t it? You can almost envision the seductive eyelashes, the dark meaningful looks, and the couple indulging in the pleasures of the forbidden.
But this is no R-rated movie. It is the ancient book of James, describing the compelling, seductive power of sin. Listen to the scripture again:
“Each (person) is tempted, when by his own evil desire he is dragged away and enticed. Then, after desire is conceived, it gives birth to sin; and sin, when it is full grown leads to death” (James 1:14,15).
It would be a mistake, of course, to limit the application of this verse to “sexual” sins. We can as easily be seduced by the pleasures of anger. “Boy did I let him have it! I told her where to go!” Or the pleasures of gossip. “Wow what juicy information! I can’t wait to tell Gertrude and Jerry!”
James knew the power of sin’s pull. He portrayed it in terms of an alluring seduction. Sin is seductive. And pleasurable. And fatal. It “leads to death.” That is the part that the pulp fiction fails to mention. The tragedy and sorrow that sin inevitably brings, well, that happens after the movie ends. That’s part of the seduction, I suppose, to omit the hard facts of sin’s consequences. After the momentary joys, there follows the heartbreak and shame.
Another Biblical writer put it this way: “The wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life” (Romans 6:23). So the next time sin flashes a sparkling eye at you, remember the novel’s sordid ending. Don’t be seduced!


James knew the power of sin’s pull. He portrayed it in terms of an alluring seduction.

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